In this July 30, 1981 photo, John Coleman, weather channel founder, right, and Frank Batten, publisher of the Norfolk, Va., Virginian-Pilot and Ledger-Star, and chairman and chief executive of Landmark Communications, Inc., are seen during a news conference in New York. John Coleman, the founder of The Weather Channel and longtime KUSI weatherman, died Saturday night, Jan. 20, 2018, at home in Las Vegas, said his wife Linda Coleman. He was 83. Marty Lederhandler, AP


Chrysabelle: Our protagonist - who sadly suffers from a bit of first-book awkwardness. Like so many urban fantasy heroines, Chrysabelle hasn't really settled in as a character. She's over 100 years old, trained to be a graceful, well spoken companion to the upper echelon of vampire society. I would expect her age and training to make her someone self-contained, wise, and socially savvy. What we get is a more standard sort of bad ass urban fantasy vixen with a bit of a temper, a tendency to flare up at people, and a "slice first ask questions later" mentality. Sound familiar? Yup she's like many other urban fantasy chic out there - which works and it's certainly an enjoyable archetype, it just doesn't make sense to me based on her age. I also didn't get a strong sense of her phycology - why she is the way she is. Her internal monolog didn't reveal enough. Because of this, I didn't feel as attached to her as a character. Things I did appreciate about her - she's open minded, loyal, protective of those she cares about. She doesn't turn her back on friends. I did actually come to like her, I just didn't feel close to her as a character. I expect this will change in later books - And the male lead, makes up for any lack I find in Crysabelle.

(Edit of my previous review; a call back number typo situation).  I am very pleased that I was personally contacted by the owner and Sugar House Painting is going the extra mile to provide us with an estimate.  They care about their business and how they are perceived, and I hopefully will be able to leave a great follow-up review once we have the work finished which I have no doubt will be excellent. Thanks to SHP again!
Dave, you said it best! Every pro painting contractor truly worth their salt would and should cut and paste exactly what you say here about where customary and legitimate practices and expectations should be in regards to what customers should expect from contractors and how contractors should professionally deal with their customers. By the way, Dave, if you work in the Atlanta area, I would like to hire you! Thank you for your valuable advice!
Leading the commercial painting industry in the state, The Painting Company of Birmingham staffs a team of expert painting contractors that are dedicated to promoting the type of image you want for your business. Like our residential painting services, our company’s commercial painting in Birmingham is of the highest quality and is backed by our warranty. Whether we are working on an interior or exterior project, The Painting Company of Birmingham is the best painting contractor in Alabama.
Deciding which paint to use has gotten much easier now that acrylic latexes have pushed oil-based paints almost to extinction. The acrylics offer superior performance (they don't harden with age, the way oils do, so they move and breathe without blistering), they don't mildew as readily, and they emit fewer VOCs, so they comply with new air-quality regulations. They also work over both oil- and water-based primers.
All Los Angeles Painting Company, Inc., 310-470-9218, is a residential house painting company servicing all Los Angeles from Malibu to Pasadena and beyond.  We are rated by the Franklin Report, the most trusted Los Angeles home services guide, as an extraordinary value providing the highest quality service at reasonable prices.  All Los Angeles Painting consistently earns the highest consumer reviews regarding expert craftsmanship, reliability, attention to detail, value, project management and professionalism. 
Steve, not only did you come off with an edge regarding the article written for Angie's list but you came awfully close to being slanderous. The article was written if you will have read his bio by a very well established professional painter. The issue regarding the deposit was put in question by a responder. I have read your response in full as you suggested, and companies as large as yours are just as likely to use the tricks of the trade as the small guy as you suggest, if not more so. A large company has less oversight and workers get lazy with the boss not looking over their shoulder. I have had experience in this area, and thought that i was dealing with a very reputable company that had been recommended by a couple friends, my insurance company, and my adjuster who had dealt with the company. I had terrible problems with the company, who do full restorations and like your company paint in all areas. To finalize your statement that Established businesses do not cheat customers is completly false and is a very misleading statement. I am suprised that Angies list allowed you to post such an outragious comment. All you have to do is look in the Civil lawsuits section of the Established businesses that are being sued or are under investigation for fraud and cheating their customers!
In England, little is known of the trade and its structures before the late 13th century, at which paint guilds began to form, amongst them the Painters Company and the Stainers Company. These two guilds eventually merged with the consent of the Lord Mayor of the City of London in 1502, forming the Worshipful Company of Painter-Stainers. The guild standardised the craft and acted as a protector of the trade secrets. In 1599, the guild asked Parliament for protection, which was eventually granted in a bill of 1606, which granted the trade protection from outside competition such as plasterers.[2]
Oh, where to begin? Let me start with 'watered down paint'. 25-50% before the material gets to the site? Impossible. You would basically be painting with water at that point. It would be less of a hassle, and cost, to simply use proper material. You would be forced to apply three coats instead of two, as the coverage would be horrible. Whatever cost you think might be saved in materials would be lost in labor.
In this Aug. 25, 1992 file photo, Jerry Van Dyke, left, and his brother, Dick, laugh during a party in Los Angeles. Manager said Jan. 6, 2018, that Jerry Van Dyke, 'Coach' star and younger brother of comedian Dick Van Dyke, has died in Arkansas at 86. Manager, John Castonia, said Van Dyke died Friday at his ranch in Hot Spring County. His wife, Shirley Ann Jones, was by his side. Chris Martinez, AP
I really enjoyed this first book of the House of Comarre series. The heroine Chrysabelle is a comarre, which is described as a geisha for vampires. Her patron ends up dead and she goes on the run to avoid being blamed for it. She ends up meeting the other main characters Mal, Doc, and Fi after her escape. This story has all the usual supernatural elements like vampires, Fae, and shapeshifters but they aren't used in a generic way. The Fae in particular have some unique characteristics, and the hidden vampire society that Chrysabelle lived all her life in creates an enigmatic and fascinating background, and at times setting, for the story. Mal has a tragic backstory that gets revealed over time, and the way his, chrysabelle's, Fi's, and Doc's lives are (and become) connected will surprise you and is fascinating to read about. The evolving relationships between these four are really at the heart of the story and are what makes it so good.
This undated image released by History shows Richard Harrison from "Pawn Stars." Harrison's son Rick posted on Facebook, June 25, 2018, that his father died. He said his father was surrounded by family over the weekend. He was 77. The Navy veteran opened the Gold & Silver Pawn store in Las Vegas with his son, Rick. The TV show premiered in 2009 and features the Harrisons interacting with customers who are trying to sell or pawn objects. History via AP
I’m writing to you to say thank you formally and properly for the painting of my art deco apartment in Elwood. It’s terrific and has given the place a wonderful, well deserved lift. It was once everything was back in place, dusted and cleaned, with tulips in the vases and my newly adopted kitty, Rocky Gorgeous moved in, that I really felt at home and could appreciate all your hard work. Family, friends (including the fussy ones) and even tradesmen (including window cleaners) have commented on the attention to detail and the great paint job, in particular to the all white French doors, sash windows and skirting boards. I’m delighted with the preparation, paint work and tidy up. The place looks great in all the  different lights of day with the paintings and decor looking much better, as well against the new backdrop of the fresh paint.
That aside, this was all telling and no showing. The protagonist's harrowing escape from vampire servitude is glossed over with a few boring sentences of infodump here and there -- why not start the book with it??? SHOW her feeling cheated out of her freedom, SHOW her escaping. The characters had almost zero personality aside from the one-dimensional "I'm Pure Eeeeevil!" antagonist and the embarrassing, squicky attempt to write a "sassy" black character. Most of the action consists of characters endlessly rehashing events that happen, inexplicably, off-screen. Giving up.
In this Feb. 12, 2015 photo, Japanese animated film director Isao Takahata speaks about his latest film "The Tale of The Princess Kaguya" with its poster during an interview at his office, Studio Ghibli, in suburban Tokyo. Takahata, co-founder of the prestigious Japanese animator Studio Ghibli that stuck to a hand-drawn "manga" look in the face of digital filmmaking, has died. He was 82. Takahata, who directed "Grave of the Fireflies," a tragic tale about wartime childhood, died Thursday, April 5, 2018, of lung cancer at a Tokyo hospital, according to a studio statement. Shizuo Kambayashi, AP
The house bath may reveal nails that have popped out of the siding or rusting nail heads that have left streaks of rust on exterior walls. If so, use sandpaper or steel wool to clean the nail heads. On clapboard siding, use a nail set to recess the nail head about ⅛ inch below the surface of the wood. Dab on a coat of rust-inhibiting primer (unless the nail is aluminum or nonrusting galvanized steel), and let it dry. Then fill the nail hole with spackle or putty. When the filler is dry, give it a coat of primer. For flathead nails, which cannot be recessed, sand the heads until they're shiny, and coat with primer.

Some proposals simply say to paint the walls and ceiling and never specify the number of coats to be applied. If the colors are similar enough, it's possible to get away with one coat of paint and not discount your pricing. No matter how hard you try, tiny, pin-sized air holes will pop exposing the original walls. This may not bother you if you can't notice it, but principally speaking you should have paid your painter less for the work.
I just read your article and am very impressed. Am an Operations person with a private company. I’ve been wanting to start a painting business due to my high interest but haven’t done so yet. I’ve registered a general company though. Would like to do the business side by side my 8 to 5 job by marketing and sub contracting contracts. This will be my way of planning for my retirement. Your advise will be helpful. Thank you. Cosy
In this Sept. 12, 2015 file photo, Anthony Bourdain, winner of the award for outstanding informational series or special for "Anthony Bourdain Parts Unknown," poses with his trophy in the press room at the Creative Arts Emmy Awards in Los Angeles. On June 8, 2018, Bourdain was found dead in his hotel room in France, while working on his CNN series on culinary traditions around the world. Chris Pizzello, Invision/AP
Home Painters Ottawa is one of the leading painting contractors in Ottawa. Since 1991, we have been providing interior and exterior painting, as well as handyman services, for residential and commercial spaces. Our proven 25-year track record has been sustained by our thousands of satisfied customers! Please feel free to Call (613) 699 6062 or Email us at [email protected] for a FREE quote for your project today!
Use a wire brush and a wide-blade putty knife to remove small areas of defective paint. Scrub under the laps of clapboard siding as well as on downspouts and gutters. For speedier work on metal, a wire brush attachment on an electric drill will remove rust and paint with less effort. For more extensive paint removal, invest in a sharp pull scraper -- a tool with a replaceable blade that's capable of stripping old paint all the way down to bare wood with a single scrape. Hold the scraper so the blade is perpendicular to the wood, apply moderate to firm pressure, and drag it along the surface. Keep the blade flat against the wood so it doesn't gouge the surface.

I bought this because an excerpt was included at the end of another Orbit book I was reading, and I have to say I feel like I'm reading bad Buffy fanfic. At least two thirds of the characters even share names with Whedon characters, and when I got to the bits about the character called "the Aurelian," I think I actually groaned out loud on the commuter train. Come on, at least name your own characters!

The Cutters. Someone with meticulous attention to detail and a steady hand should be assigned the job of "cutting in," or painting a straight edge where needed, such as along a wall where the ceiling does not get painted. Many products are available to assist, but none work as well as a person who's good at doing it freehand. Ensure this person is skilled (ask them to show you). A poor, jagged, wavy or splotched cutting-in job will jump out at you every time you walk by it. Why more than one cutter? This job is nerve-wracking and painful to hands and arms after a few days. You'll want to give this person a break after a few walls.
I agree with you Richard, as a painting contractor for very many years, people are always looking to get more and more out of you. I had to give an estimate to a lady a few weeks ago who had more stuff around her home than a thrift store including heavy furniture, stuff all over the floor and junk everywhere. I knew if I accepted the job id be a furniture mover and cleaner. I also agree this article makes it seem like the contractor is out to rip off the customers. Fact is I always leave doing more work than agreed upon. It doesn't bother me since the customer is always satisfied. Just saying
Hi Eric, I’ve been spray painting for about 25 years in the marine industry, I’ve painted everything from super yachts, industrial barges, cars, an even factory’s plus houses. I have always worked for others (businesses) never been business minded, recently I went into business with a couple partners, an it started off ok but eventually went down hill from there, One of my partners claimed he knew how a business should be so I followed his lead, a lot of his decisions he made lost us a lot of work, eventually losing all contracts due to his stubbornness, saying this is how business is run. Now I have decided to step away from the company an go on my own. I watched the video of you ( how to start a business from scratch) an was blown away!!! Everything you stated in the clip? We did none of that when we started our company, (following the lead of my business partner) poured so much of my savings into it in the beginning an financially ruined me, I could go on for ever but now I’m broke, I’m starting to do sub contracting work now to get back on track with living expenses, I am going to start my own business an see where I go from there. I will take on what you said in the clip, an see how go. Thanks kind regards Richard
Burt Reynolds poses for a portrait to promote his movie "The Last Movie Star." Photographed at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif. on Mar. 21, 2018. Actor Burt Reynolds died on Sept. 6, 2018, his publicist announced.The 82-year-old actor, who was a huge box office attraction in the 1970s, died at a hospital in Florida. Dan MacMedan, USA TODAY

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