I contacted six highly-rated contractors to receive bids for painting the exterior of my Eagle Rock house. Two never responded, one was too busy to schedule the work before spring, and three responded promptly with inspections and cost estimates. Mr. Lee of House Painting, Inc. also provided a printed list of references and copies of his business license, insurance and BBB rating. He was low bidder by a small margin, and I contracted with him for the work. His crew was outstanding - excellent preparation (sanding, priming, stucco patching), fast and efficient paint coverage, and excellent clean-up at the end of each work day. I will certainly call them in the future for interior painting.

Recently I had the outside of my home painted. The contractor wrote a good contract, but I failed to realize that some things were not in it. It reminds me of the car dealer who offered a good price on a new car but failed to mention that it did not include tires. My contractor failed to specify that lattice under a porch was included. So the painters did not paint it. To his credit, he did instruct them to paint it when I brought it to his attention. If I had the job to do over again I would look for an individual who came with referrals from happy customers rather than a franchise owner..
I managed commercial construction projects for many years, have built and remodeled several properties, and never once have I encountered any of these scams. The tone of this article is deeply troubling. The author seems to be saying that ALL painting contractors are inherently dishonest, and that has not been my experience. The underlying advice here is sound: get it all in writing and cover as many contingencies as possible--so pointing out potential pitfalls like coat coverage is helpful. But do that in the spirit of clear communication of expectations, not with the expectation that the person you are hiring will try to cheat you at every turn. Not every contractor takes outrageous advantage of change orders; not every contractor will sneak past necessary preparation and/or repairs. Contractors of all sorts get a bad rap as it is; reinforcing a stereotype with articles written from this point of view just seems unproductive.
Prep the house. Wash the walls, remove wallpaper, patch, spackle, seal stains, dry and sand before you attempt to paint. Now is also the time to apply painters tape for trimming, lay drop cloths, etc. Remove all outlet and light switch face plates, collecting screws in a zip-top bag (good opportunity to wash the face plates all at once as well). You can also buy your paint at this time. Don't wait until the last minute. It can take hours to mix many gallons of all your colors. Remember that traffic triples at your home-supply and hardware stores on weekends. Buy on a weekday if possible.
"Cutting in is an acquired skill, but it's something you can't do at all with a ratty brush," says Doherty. When cutting in on a wall, he loads his brush and spreads out the excess paint, then works the brush up to the line between wall and ceiling. A brush stroke that's too wide creates a hatband, or smooth brushed band, on the very top of the wall where it meets the ceiling. To avoid this, Dixon recommends rolling first and then cutting in with a brush. "A good roller can get within 1/2 inch of the ceiling," he says. "You'll save time by not brushing more then you have to." When painting baseboards, "a wide taping knife makes a good paint guard," says Span. "Just keep the blade clean to prevent drips from working around the edge of the knife."
All colors have a base tone which might not be as apparent on a small swatch, but when the color is painted over an entire wall or room – the base color will stand out. Brown colors will sometimes appear to have a pink hue to them, and greys very often have some purple or blue to them. To avoid being surprised by a base color, take some time to look at the color fan deck for the selected paint color to see where the color comes from.
• One room or the whole house? Applying one coat in one room is a reasonable DIY Saturday project (especially if you have help and beer). Multiply the time spent moving furniture, prepping walls and sanding old trim by the number of rooms in the house, and you might want to hire real help. It's the same outside. You can probably tackle one shady garage wall that needs a little scraping and sanding plus a coat of paint, but covering all surfaces of the house is usually best left to a pro.
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Oh, where to begin? Let me start with 'watered down paint'. 25-50% before the material gets to the site? Impossible. You would basically be painting with water at that point. It would be less of a hassle, and cost, to simply use proper material. You would be forced to apply three coats instead of two, as the coverage would be horrible. Whatever cost you think might be saved in materials would be lost in labor.
This is so much different than Kristen’s other work. She’s one of my favorite authors. I had read House Of The Rising Sun before this one and was told that that trilogy would be enjoyed even more, hard to get any better than it was, if I read this Comarre series first. They tie in together but don’t have to be read in order. This first book has a lot of telling but I feel like that is necessary because this is a big world so it needs that world building. I loved all the main characters. I really liked the uniqueness of Crysabell (spelling?) needing to be bled or have a vampire feed from her or she would be like blood drunk. It’s her purpose to feed her vampire.
If you do decide to make it a full-time business, the sky’s the limit. The house flipper/contractor that I worked for billed clients $35 per hour for painting, and paid his best painters perhaps half of that, so there is room for some profit there. Consider the case of Matt Shoup, who started with $100 and went door-to-door, asking neighbors if they needed some painting done, then built a painting business that earns $2.5 million per year!

In this Jan. 11, 2004 file photo former Congressman Ron Dellums gives a speech during a celebration honoring slain civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Oakland, Calif. Dellums, a fiery anti-war activist who championed social justice as Northern California's first black congressman, has died at age 82. Longtime adviser Dan Lindheim says Dellums died early Monday, July 30, 2018, at his home in Washington, D.C., of cancer. Nick Lammers, East Bay Times via AP
First off all clients want a "deal" As a painting contractor for 38 years I can tell you that residential-commercial-industrial clients (and their needs are all diffrent. It seems this discussion mostly concerns residential repaints,so here goes--first off ALWAYS get a personal referance from a friend or co-worker. Always get an itemized contract that specifies the prep,color, number of coats, and specifics on payment. Remember you want to set up a relationship with the painting contractor of your choice. Bond, license and insurance are required to get a contractors license and are readily available online at your state Labor and Industries website. Second-- find someone you trust. He or his crew will probably be left alone in your home for most of the time. I always tell my clients that I wont bring someone to their home I wouldnt have in mine. Third--$$ Dont ever pay up front always insist on progress draws if the project is 2 or 3 phases remember If a contractor wants $3000 to do the job and you give him half up front he will be working for $1500. It WILL affect the quality of the product. In 38 years of business I have never taken a deposit and have never not been paid in full remember do what you said you would do for exactly what you said it would cost and there will be no problems with getting paid. one last reminder to clients you are also being evaluated when you interview a contractor. He is sizing you up as well. If he thinks you are a bit sketchy the the price will go up or he wont take the job at all. I have turned down some jobs that looked very profitable on the surface that turned out not to be so.(word gets around fast in the small painting community) Good Luck to clients and contractors
Prince Consort Henrik of Denmark presents his new collection of poems 'Roue-Libre' (Freewheel) at the Royal Yacht in Copenhagen, Denmark on June 16, 2010. Prince Henrik of Denmark has died at the age of 83. In 2017, he was diagnosed with dementia and was recently hospitalized after falling ill in Egypt. He returned to Denmark for a stay in the Rigshospitale in Copenhagen, and during a series of examinations a benign tumor was discovered on his left lung. His condition worsened and, according to media reports, he passed away in his sleep at Fredensborg Palace on the evening of Feb. 13, 2018. Prince Henrik is survived by his wife, two sons and eight grandchildren. Keld Navntoft, Scanpix Denmark via EPA-EFE
Wonder how much Festool is paying Silva to showcase their outrageously expensive line of tools. He used practically the entire product line on this project that was nothing more than a Festool commercial. I guess the brad nailer company didn't offer any kickbacks to the crew because you never saw their brand name. This show has turned into nothing more than crass commercialism. And when did Silva become a 'master carpenter'. He can't hold a candle to Abrams. Never could. But he's definitely better at milking the sponsors. Would love to see the inside of his workshop.

Ronaldo was our painter and we are thrilled with his work. He was lovely to have in our home, always left everything very clean, and truly went above and beyond. You could tell he really cares about his work. We had a tight timeline at the beginning of the job as we were moving furniture back into the house and Rob stayed very close to me to address concerns I had about meeting the timeline which I really appreciated.

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