In this April 13, 2012 photo, Roy Clark smirks after joking around during his 79th birthday show at The Joint in the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Catoosa, Okla. Clark, the guitar virtuoso and singer who headlined the cornpone TV show "Hee Haw" for nearly a quarter century and was known for such hits as “Yesterday When I was Young” and “Honeymoon Feeling,” has died. He was 85. Publicist Jeremy Westby said Clark died Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018, due to complications from pneumonia at home in Tulsa, Okla. Tulsa World File, Tulsa World via AP
hello, Eric I just wanted to thank you for the time and information you put in to this, Ive been wanting to start my own small paint business for a long time but I was like a lot of other people,i didn’t know how to get it started or even how to estimate a job.this information you give is very helpful and already learned a lot just from reading the material you provided on here and clicking on some of your links.you have been a blessing and gave me that extra push and know how to get my small business started.
Daedra Charles of the Los Angeles Sparks in action during a game against the Utah Starzz at the Great Western Forum in Inglewood, Calif. on July 11, 1997. Daedra Charles-Furlow, known as Daedra Charles when she played for Tennessee from 1988-91, a women's basketball Hall of Famer who played on Tennessee's 1989 and 1991 national championship teams, has died. She was 49. Harry How, Getty Images
Recently I had the outside of my home painted. The contractor wrote a good contract, but I failed to realize that some things were not in it. It reminds me of the car dealer who offered a good price on a new car but failed to mention that it did not include tires. My contractor failed to specify that lattice under a porch was included. So the painters did not paint it. To his credit, he did instruct them to paint it when I brought it to his attention. If I had the job to do over again I would look for an individual who came with referrals from happy customers rather than a franchise owner..
In this Feb. 12, 2015 photo, Japanese animated film director Isao Takahata speaks about his latest film "The Tale of The Princess Kaguya" with its poster during an interview at his office, Studio Ghibli, in suburban Tokyo. Takahata, co-founder of the prestigious Japanese animator Studio Ghibli that stuck to a hand-drawn "manga" look in the face of digital filmmaking, has died. He was 82. Takahata, who directed "Grave of the Fireflies," a tragic tale about wartime childhood, died Thursday, April 5, 2018, of lung cancer at a Tokyo hospital, according to a studio statement. Shizuo Kambayashi, AP
To begin, move everything out of the room. Every painter we spoke with had a horror story about the time he didn't follow Rule No. 1. Bigger pieces of furniture can sometimes be left covered in the center of larger rooms, but if you are repairing drywall, says Chris Span, of Span's Quality Painting in Mobile, Alabama, "Take everything out. Drywall dust goes everywhere." Remove doors, light fixtures and hardware, and label everything with masking tape. Also, invest in drop cloths. "It's surprising how well a few drops of paint can cover a floor," says Rich Maceyunas, of Maceyunas Painting and Wallpaper in Waterbury, Connecticut. Buy high-quality drop cloths, such as canvas or paper-backed plastic. (Paint soaks right through lightweight fabrics and bedsheets.) Plastic sheeting works, but it's very slippery and doesn't absorb drips.
If the point of hiring a well established, experienced, reputable painting contractor is to secure the professionalism and trust suggested to be inherent with that choice, then I would EXPECT that professionalism and experience to include the ability to make the proper and correct calculations for labor and materials for a fixed price quote, and there should be NO reason for the contractor to put the cost burden of their miscalculation on the consumer.

I'm an architect and my firm routinely specifies interior finishes for projects so I thought I'd contribute a professional's perspective on the issue of how many coats of paint are deemed "acceptable". The fact of the matter is the average consumer usually isn't a paint expert and can't be expected to know about all the factors that impact coverage. That knowledge is considered "means and methods" and in a court of law, the responsibility lies with the painter or general contractor, not the consumer. What the consumer should be concerned about is the final result-does it look good and is it what you expected? The simplest way to communicate this to your painter is to stipule in your written agreement that the number of coats will be "as required to cover". That way all the guess work about what kind of primer, how many coats, how color affects the scope of work, etc., is removed from the consumer's responsibility and resides where it belongs-with the professional. In the contract that's why retention is always a good idea-typically 10% is withheld from payment until the job is completed to the satisfaction of the customer. Of course in return you as the customer have to be reasonable about what constitutes a completed job. Just my $.02.
Ask companies to include all details in writing. Although that sounds simple enough, too many contractors submit offers such as "paint house for $5,000." A friendly contractor may offer a reassuring handshake and promise that the crew will take care of all the details — starting on time, working every day, cleaning up, etc. That's great, but why not include each point in the proposal? If it's a challenge to get a written description of labor, materials and other details, things will probably get worse when the work starts.
"Modern paints dry too quickly, and are difficult to brush out," says Dixon, who uses paint additives, such as Floetrol for latex paints and Penetrol for alkyds. "Adding a few ounces per gallon slows drying time and makes the paint more workable," he says. Another problem is bridging. "Latex paints form a skin," says Dixon. "Removing painted tape can tear the skin, resulting in a ragged rather than a sharp line." Lastly, taping takes time. "Learning how to cut in with a brush takes practice, but if you can do it, you'll leave most tapers in the dust," Dixon says. (Cutting in is painting just the surface you want, not the surface adjacent to it — for example, where a wall meets the ceiling.) Although there are mildewcide additives, our pros prefer using bathroom and kitchen paints that have built-in mildew fighters. "These paints will prevent mildew from forming, but they won't kill mildew that's already there," Dixon points out. Because leftover mold spores can live beneath the paint and eventually work their way through to the surface, you should also prep bath and kitchen surfaces. First, wash down the walls with a bleach solution (3/4 cup of bleach per gallon of water) then seal with a stain-blocking primer, such as Zinsser's Bulls Eye 1-2-3 or Kilz's Total One.
Do you need to paint your house, but also find yourself thinking of walking out of your office for good and picking up a paint gun instead? Does the thought of simple work with immediate results that you can see everyday sound much better than the frustrating mess of dealing with the people in your "white collar" job? Want to be a craftsman? Well guess what? It's not so simple as you might hope... Great book that will give you insight into the world of painting for a living and the folks who do. The authors website is also full of information on how to do the job right the first time. Much appreciated.
All Los Angeles Painting Company, Inc., 310-470-9218, is a residential house painting company servicing all Los Angeles from Malibu to Pasadena and beyond.  We are rated by the Franklin Report, the most trusted Los Angeles home services guide, as an extraordinary value providing the highest quality service at reasonable prices.  All Los Angeles Painting consistently earns the highest consumer reviews regarding expert craftsmanship, reliability, attention to detail, value, project management and professionalism. 
The materials of the home’s facade should be considered before painting your home. When painting flat surfaces like siding or wood, you can opt for standard outdoor paint. When painting a textured surface like stucco or brick, “elastomeric” paint is a much better choice. This type of paint can stretch more than normal paint, which allows it to bridge over small gaps and crevices, painting smoothly over texture.
Plan the workforce. If you intend to not hire a professional crew, you'll need lots of help. There are many jobs to be done. First there's the furniture moving, then wall preparation, floor covering, materials gathering and prep, cleaning, and don't forget everyone will have to eat. It can easily take a team of five people a full ten days to paint a two-story (approx 2000 sq.ft.) home. Get as many people to help as you can. If some can only come one or two days, great. Maybe others can fill in. Ensure you plan with your workforce members in mind. They'll need plenty of time to arrange days away from work. Identify a few key personnel:
I used to work at Sherwin Williams. The best thing to do is specify that you will purchase your own paint. If the painter objects strenuously, he was plaanning on making money in the ways this article outlines. You might pay a few dollars more for paint, but you will have control of the quality of what goes on your walls. Never skimp on paint quality.
If you're looking for a professional painting and home renovation company with years of experience to prove it, then look no further, Home Painters Toronto is the contractor for you. We specialize in interior, exterior, residential, and commercial painting and our services don't stop there! We can also help you with drywall repair and installation, plaster, stucco ceiling repair and removal, carpentry, Kitchen Cabinet repainting, hardwood flooring and much more! Call one of our customer service experts now and be well on your way to a quote and a beautifully transformed property.
Reliable, diligent. The work was done well and very professionally. Didn’t give 5 stars only because there was a bit of a mess left - not just in the area but for example, paint drippings on the windows and window sills, water mixed with paint drips on the laundry room floor by the sink where the paint trays were rinsed. Very happy with the work itself though

Not all people live where they can hire a painting contractor, like you describe. People who live in small towns can only hire painters who have a very small business, and do two or three paint jobs per week. In this case, you do have to be very careful, when you hire a painter, as we have several, in our area, who are out to make a fast buck anyway they can.
A good paintbrush is key to a professional-looking finish. "A quality brush costs $15 to $25, but you'll discover that pros aren't as talented as you thought," says Doherty. "The equipment has a lot to do with their success." Most of our pros prefer natural-bristle brushes for oil-based paints, but they recommend synthetics for all-around use. When choosing a brush, pay attention to the bristles. Synthetic brushes are made of nylon or polyester, or a combination of the two. Poly bristles are stiffer, which makes them good for exterior or textured work, but for fine interior work, Doherty uses softer nylon brushes. Look also for tapered bristles, which can help you work to an edge, and flagged tips, which help spread the finish smoothly and evenly. Brushes are available in 1- to 4-inch widths. Most painters keep an arsenal on hand to match the job. "Use common sense," says Maceyunas. "A smaller brush gives you more control, but no one wants to paint a door with a 1-inch-wide brush." Doherty recommends starting with a 2- or 2-1/2-inch sash brush. The angled brush makes it easier to cut to a line and puts more bristles on the work than a square-tipped brush.

In this Jan. 25, 2014, file photo, Rick Hall attends The 56th Annual GRAMMY Awards - Special Merit Awards Ceremony in Los Angeles. Hall, an Alabama record producer who recorded some of the biggest musical acts of the 1960s and `70s and helped develop the fabled "Muscle Shoals sound," died Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2018, following a fight with cancer, his longtime friend Judy Hood said. He was 85. Todd Williamson, Invision/AP


In this Aug. 19, 2005, file photo, Seattle Storm coach Anne Donovan, right, smiles as she is handed the game ball by team official Karen Bryant following the Storm's victory over the Minnesota Lyn in Seattle. The victory gave Donovan her 100th career WNBA victory as a coach, the first woman to reach that plateau. Donovan died on June 13, 2018, of heart failure. She was 56. Donovan's family confirmed the death in a statement. Elaine Thompson, AP

I agree with you Richard, as a painting contractor for very many years, people are always looking to get more and more out of you. I had to give an estimate to a lady a few weeks ago who had more stuff around her home than a thrift store including heavy furniture, stuff all over the floor and junk everywhere. I knew if I accepted the job id be a furniture mover and cleaner. I also agree this article makes it seem like the contractor is out to rip off the customers. Fact is I always leave doing more work than agreed upon. It doesn't bother me since the customer is always satisfied. Just saying
Not only do we give you beautiful color, but our skilled San Antonio painters also provide professional level craftsmanship each step of the way, so that your new paint job lasts. We handle the hard work, while you focus on relaxing. Give us a call or fill out our form to schedule a fast, no-pressure walk through of your home or business, so we can give you the best possible pricing!

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