(Edit of my previous review; a call back number typo situation).  I am very pleased that I was personally contacted by the owner and Sugar House Painting is going the extra mile to provide us with an estimate.  They care about their business and how they are perceived, and I hopefully will be able to leave a great follow-up review once we have the work finished which I have no doubt will be excellent. Thanks to SHP again!

We had a bad experience with an interior painter years ago, with the crux of the problem being him overcharging us at the end for "extra work" he didn't anticipate. One thing I'd strongly recommend is making sure it's in the contract that any additional work or growth work is estimated and communicated to the owner as soon as it is identified, otherwise the owner is not liable to pay it at the end.


Painters often tint primer close to the color of the top coat, but Wallis thinks that's a recipe for "holidays," or missed spots. Instead, he tints his primer a contrasting color. "If I can see the color coming through, I know I need to apply more paint," he says. On the cottage shown in this story, he chose a gray-blue primer to go under a peach top coat.
Every painting job develops a unique choreography as ladders go up and come down and tarps are unrolled and folded up. But two basic principles remain: 1) Start at the top and work down. 2) Work in the shade, out of the sun's glare. As the dance proceeds, keep an eye on the weather. Rain can wash freshly applied latex right off the wall, and a temperature dip below 50 degrees F two days after application can interfere with adhesion and curing and dull the sheen of glossy paints. (Latexes like Sherwin-Williams's Duration and Benjamin Moore's MoorGard Low Lustre are formulated to tolerate temps as low as 35 and 40 degrees, respectively.)
I hired this person because he was listed on Angie's List. This man claimed he took and passed his contractor's license test after he signed me up for a project (Feb.) that included fixing cracks, painting, repairing a gate, installing a screen door, etc. He said he would charge me the original "handyman" prices. He postponed the start date, brought one worker who fixed a few cracks, repainted the gate terribly, but ruined a dining room ceiling when his worker used silicone in a tube instead of the expansion tape, spray ceiling covering, and paint I had purchased saying this silicone was "better". Then they said they would have to paint the whole ceiling and charge extra. They left holes in the walls and did a sloppy paint job in several places. I just paid them to get them out of my home as I felt intimidated as a senior citizen who is handicapped. I will try to have the main guy come back when I let him know what I need redone. Don't know if he will come back without charging me more.
First off all clients want a "deal" As a painting contractor for 38 years I can tell you that residential-commercial-industrial clients (and their needs are all diffrent. It seems this discussion mostly concerns residential repaints,so here goes--first off ALWAYS get a personal referance from a friend or co-worker. Always get an itemized contract that specifies the prep,color, number of coats, and specifics on payment. Remember you want to set up a relationship with the painting contractor of your choice. Bond, license and insurance are required to get a contractors license and are readily available online at your state Labor and Industries website. Second-- find someone you trust. He or his crew will probably be left alone in your home for most of the time. I always tell my clients that I wont bring someone to their home I wouldnt have in mine. Third--$$ Dont ever pay up front always insist on progress draws if the project is 2 or 3 phases remember If a contractor wants $3000 to do the job and you give him half up front he will be working for $1500. It WILL affect the quality of the product. In 38 years of business I have never taken a deposit and have never not been paid in full remember do what you said you would do for exactly what you said it would cost and there will be no problems with getting paid. one last reminder to clients you are also being evaluated when you interview a contractor. He is sizing you up as well. If he thinks you are a bit sketchy the the price will go up or he wont take the job at all. I have turned down some jobs that looked very profitable on the surface that turned out not to be so.(word gets around fast in the small painting community) Good Luck to clients and contractors
We've been going the rounds trying to find a painter we felt could meet the needs of our full home repaint. I wanted to pull my hair out at times because no one seemed to give us the sense of confidence we were looking for. Someone recommended Sugar House Painting so we gave them a call. The moment we made the call we knew we were onto something different. Their level of communication, input, advice, and know-how was exactly what we were looking for - not to mention a superior product! Amazing attention to detail, razor sharp lines, and flawless finishes throughout. They were so easy to work with and we're so happy with the work they did. We would recommend them to anyone! Do yourself a favor and give these guys a call. You won't be disappointed.
Hello! My name is Jake. I take pride in being able to help people out with whatever job or task that they need completed. As a retired member of the US Navy, I take pride in every job that I do and strive for a job well done and customer satisfaction everytime. I have significant experience in just about every possible job around the house and I look forward to getting you taken care of!
To paint a large section without leaving lap marks, roll the nearly dry roller in different directions along the dry edge, feathering out the paint as you go. After completing the entire length of the wall or ceiling, move to the next section and paint over the feathered edges. For the second coat, apply the paint in the opposite direction. This crisscrossing paint application sharply reduces (if not eliminates) lap marks.
Burt Reynolds poses for a portrait to promote his movie "The Last Movie Star." Photographed at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif. on Mar. 21, 2018. Actor Burt Reynolds died on Sept. 6, 2018, his publicist announced.The 82-year-old actor, who was a huge box office attraction in the 1970s, died at a hospital in Florida. Dan MacMedan, USA TODAY

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