Start by thoroughly examining the outside of the house or outbuilding -- not just the exterior walls but under the eaves, around windows and doors, and along the foundation. Look for split shingles and siding, popped nails, peeling or blistering paint, mildew, and rust stains. Once you've identified the areas that need attention, roll up your sleeves and make the repairs.
Thanks for the information.I have beenvpainting on and off again for the past 20 yrs.And have seen alot of different type painters.Which makes me interested and believe I should do good and be successful at a painting company. I’m 41 wasted alot if time working for people in the construction field. Because the money was always good I believe that’s what made it hard for me to see what would be more secure for my family’s future.Until the past7 years with alt of life’s situations and bad buisness choices on the company’s owner not the help. It’s put me in a bad situation financially a time or two.I’ve took ]ride in my painting,until I was forced to help a friend out with section 8 housing wich was under the tablebwich as the last few jobs money was excellent cause painters was impossible to find good ones even though it was section 8 as I found out none of the work was really done properly.As usual family buisness never ment my family’s survival wich I’m not going to keep going on wich these are the reasons I want to thank you for your time and concern to offer help in this area. I feel that I have allot to offer this buisness and need to make this count me my fiance 5 yr old son yet old daughter,and15monthbold bsbybgirl.I’ve given so much of myself to this field to only in the end realize my family’s fait is in someone else’s hands in more ways than I realized.wich is why it’s a must for me to succeed.

I turn away any job when the client refuses to pay anything up front. It sends a red flag. I also charge a scheduling fee which is non-refundable. I get 33 percent when I show up and begin work. Another percentage halfway through, and the balance upon completion after client is satisfied. There needs to be skin in the game for both parties as a measure of good faith. If you are dealing with a reputable company (did your due diligence, right?) why wouldn't you want to pay something as work progresses? We do this not only because we love to paint but we require cash flow to stay in business. There is not always 'money in the bank' as you suggest. It's tough these days. The suggestion buy 'Kim' 'Never pay a contractor a deposit' is nonsensical.
Before the scrubdown, protect nearby plants by misting their leaves and saturating the surrounding soil with water, pulling them away from the house, and shrouding them in fabric drop cloths. (Plants will cook under plastic.) Lay more drop cloths along the base of the walls to collect any falling paint debris. Walls should be wet down before getting scrubbed, then washed with a gallon of water mixed with 1 cup chlorine bleach and 1 cup of either a concentrated, phosphate-free cleaner, such as a trisodium phosphate (TSP) substitute, or Jomax House Cleaner. Working in sections, from the bottom to the top, will avoid streaks. Be sure to rinse walls well before the solution dries. Wood siding and trim should be ready to paint after a day or two of dry weather.
Hi Eric, I’ve been spray painting for about 25 years in the marine industry, I’ve painted everything from super yachts, industrial barges, cars, an even factory’s plus houses. I have always worked for others (businesses) never been business minded, recently I went into business with a couple partners, an it started off ok but eventually went down hill from there, One of my partners claimed he knew how a business should be so I followed his lead, a lot of his decisions he made lost us a lot of work, eventually losing all contracts due to his stubbornness, saying this is how business is run. Now I have decided to step away from the company an go on my own. I watched the video of you ( how to start a business from scratch) an was blown away!!! Everything you stated in the clip? We did none of that when we started our company, (following the lead of my business partner) poured so much of my savings into it in the beginning an financially ruined me, I could go on for ever but now I’m broke, I’m starting to do sub contracting work now to get back on track with living expenses, I am going to start my own business an see where I go from there. I will take on what you said in the clip, an see how go. Thanks kind regards Richard

In general, glossier paints are more stain-resistant and scrubbable. But a higher sheen also highlights any imperfections in the wall or in the paint job. "Flat paints are fine for ceilings and formal rooms, but for most of my customers, I recommend an eggshell gloss. It's good for hallways, kids' rooms, even kitchens and baths," says Toto. It seems that latex paints have won over even the most finicky painters. "Though we still use oil-based paints for restor-ation work, latex paints are fine for interior walls and new trim," says Toto, "as long as you don't go cheap on the paint." All of our pros have their personal favorites, but they agree that good paint does not come cheap. "You'll spend $20 to $35 per gallon for a top-shelf paint," says Weeks. The pros also agreed that using two coats of paint will result in the best-looking job. Don't skimp on the coverage; if you're covering more than 400 square feet per gallon, you're spreading it too thin. Also, keep 1/4 to 1/2 gallon on hand for touch-ups.
Interior painting, exterior painting, residential painting, commercial painting, plaster repair, drywall repair and installation, handyman projects, condo painting, townhouse painting, stucco ceiling flattening, wallpaper installation, wallpaper removal, kitchen cabinet painting, kitchen cabinet spraying, staircase painting, staircase staining, carpentry, crown moulding installation, trim installations, custom carpentry solutions, exterior wood repair, colour consultations, aluminum siding painting, brick painting, deck staining, fence painting, exterior caulking, interior caulking, storefront painting, office painting, home renovations.

If the point of hiring a well established, experienced, reputable painting contractor is to secure the professionalism and trust suggested to be inherent with that choice, then I would EXPECT that professionalism and experience to include the ability to make the proper and correct calculations for labor and materials for a fixed price quote, and there should be NO reason for the contractor to put the cost burden of their miscalculation on the consumer.


For particularly heavy deposits of paint, heat may be more effective than muscle. One way to apply heat is with an electric paint remover, which is a device with a platelike heating element that "cooks" the paint and has a built-in scraper to pull it off. Wearing heavy gloves, hold the heating element against the surface until the paint sizzles. Pull the remover firmly over the surface. The attached scraper will pull off the cooked paint as you go.
As any painter will tell you, prep work is just as important -- if not more important -- than the paint application itself. If the paint on your house is chipping or peeling, it needs to be scraped and sanded smooth before applying a new finish. In most cases, you won’t need to remove all the existing paint, but scraping, sanding, patching, caulking, and priming are critical steps that take place before the start of most exterior painting jobs.
Imagine waking in a living space that looks clean with colors that perfectly fit your aesthetic. At WOW 1 DAY PAINTING, we want to make this dream a reality, which is why we provide several different house painting services for you and your family. Whether you need interior house painting or exterior house painting when you work with us, you're getting the quality you expect in a timeline that's unexpected! Our friendly, uniformed crew has experience painting virtually anything you can think of, and we can't wait to help you!
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